Urban legends have become common-place  People understand what it means when you use the phrase. There are books written about urban legends, and a dialect has grown up around them.  There are themes and categories, people doing comparative analysis, and even lingo.  One of the neatest words is an acronym: FOAF.  The friend of a friend is a non-distinct, distant source of information.  You hear it, but wouldn’t want to act on it.

Or would you?  I know of someone who is travelling to a foreign country to teach for a while, and will be staying with the friend of a friend.  Gutsy – and trusting in God.

Tonight I am looking up a computer to recommend for a friend to buy.  I am going to use a site recommended by another friend.  The purchasing person is being helped by the recommending person – a friend of a friend – and that’s a good thing.

The site is Product Chart, and they will help you decide what’s important in laptops and smart phones, as well as smaller consumer electronics.  I don’t know if they have ads – I block ads with both AdBlock and AdBlock Plus, so if you are enticed to buy an ostrich pillow or a Ministry of Silly Walks watch, I’m sorry, but it’s on you (literally).

Have fun.

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