I was thinking to myself that it’s been too long since we had a communion meditation about architecture. This is going to change that.

Churches now can look like anything and be anywhere. Going way back in time, churches in the middle ages were cathedrals, lofty and soaring, inspiring people to look up to God in Heaven. Our church has some of that – the peak arching up to the skies – and that is good.

Let’s look at some practical architecture. Behind me is a brick wall. When it was built, a few decades ago, the wall was bare brick. We added the light-colored structure a few years ago, while adding a baptistry. It’s functional, holding the monitors and helping us focus on the baptistry, which was used just last week.

But it isn’t just functional, it’s reminiscent – it looks like something else. To me, it has the appearance of the altar of sacrifice from the Old Testament. Leviticus chapter 16 talks about how the high priest would enter the holy of holies one day a year, first sacrificing a sin offering for himself and then sacrificing for all the people. I don’t know that it was intentional for this bulkhead to look like an altar, and I’m always open to correction.

The other thing that this new piece of architecture did, is to move our song lyrics from the center projector screen out to the side monitors. That *was* intentional, in order to make sure that the cross was always visible.

The use of the sacrificial altar from the Old Testament did cleanse from sins, but it wasn’t permanent. It had to be repeated every year. The sacrifice offered on the cross, Jesus’s sinless sacrifice, is permanent. Hebrews 10:14 says “by one sacrifice He has made perfect forever those who are being made holy”. That’s us. That sacrifice was and is offered to all, freely given, paid for with His body and blood. That is what we celebrate now in taking communion. Let’s pray.

Father God, from before the start of time, Your perfect plan was for Your perfect, sinless Son Jesus to die on a cross for imperfect us, imperfect me. Help us to remember, always. In Jesus’ name, amen.