I have been missing a lot of church services lately – my work has kept me away about half the Sundays. I participate online, but I have to say that there is something joyful in corporate worship – singing, taking communion together, hearing the Word preached.


And that reminds me of the words of King David, in Psalm 122:1: I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go into the house of the Lord.” He was happy, joyful.


Then on one of those “compare and contrast” moments, we have Jesus cleaning out the Temple. In the book of John, it is recorded that Jesus made a whip out of cords, and used it on the people. And in John 2:16-17 “Then he said to the pigeon-dealers, “Take those things out of here. Don’t you dare turn my Father’s house into a market!” His disciples remembered the scripture — ‘Zeal for your house has eaten me up’”. Jesus wants to be joyful in the temple, but cannot be when it is being used for other purposes. He needed the temple to be holy.

We come now to the time of communion, where Jesus said “Do this in remembrance of Me”. This is a time of joy and happiness, as well as a time of becoming more holy. 1 Corinthians 11:28 says “But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup.” That is not Jesus coming in with a whip. It is an invitation for us to take a look at how we have been keeping our own temple, an invitation to be holy, and invitation to joy.

Let’s pray.

Father God, You know us, better than we know ourselves. Thank You for loving us, thank You for sending Jesus to die in our place, and thank You for continually calling us to holiness. Thank You for the ever-present reminder of communion, whether in the church house or wherever we are – because You are with us. In Jesus’ name, amen.

At Meijer yesterday, I wasn’t impressed at how well my fellow shoppers followed instructions – they got both sides 100% wrong.

They redeemed themselves by keeping the pattern up once it was started.

Good job. Silver star for you.

I started a project in June to re-digitize all my CDs. Finished all the CDs I could locate, turning them into FLAC files. I know I’m missing some, and I didn’t do my vinyl (the project could grow infinitely).

I used the excellent dBpoweramp and the accompanying PerfectTUNES to get the audio off and locate cover art. Again, still more work to do. I’m aiming for useful, not perfection.

Then Google Music shut down, so I downloaded everything I had sent to the cloud, which filled in some gaps and added some Amazon samplers as MP3s. Google downloads don’t know about folders, and every download has the group and album built into the song title. I could fix that, but the project could grow infinitely, as I may have mentioned before.

I spent some time cleaning up folder names and structures, and was finally ready to transfer it all to my phone (I really don’t like YouTube Music, Google’s replacement – it’s structured for them instead of for me, and rather forcefully. Gmail, Google Drive, and Keep are tools for me. YTMusic is all them.). And without a slot for an external memory card, it wouldn’t all fit on my phone.

I’d given myself a budget of 40G for music – seems right on a 128G phone. I had almost 180G of music. On my PC that’s fine – a 10T drive holds that without blinking. But for my phone I achieved 450% of my goal. If I was selling Girl Scout cookies that would be great. With a limited container, not so much.

With much hacking and chopping, making hard decisions, I got down to 50G and couldn’t see much more fat.

Today, Christmas of 2020, I have finally transferred all that music to my phone. No playlists yet, but I have the source material.

I verified the transfer with the always-helpful Beyond Compare. I’m playing the music through Musicolet, a local player. Yes, I paid for the upgrade to be able to cast to the TV (thank you, Google Opinion Rewards!).

Now I can carry around 2,444 songs – that’s 176 hours of music, so I can go a week without repeating – in my pocket.

Merry Christmas, Steve!

I was on LinkedIn this morning and saw this from a random company:

Wishing you and your loved ones a wonderful holiday season and a happy New Year!

I don’t think it’s right to discriminate by hiding Christmas behind “holiday” and then blithely assume everyone uses the same calendar.

And yes, appealing to an external, shared sense of “right” assumes that such a thing exists. Which it does. And that’s why I’m celebrating Christmas, the birth of Jesus the Christ, instead of an amorphous “holiday”.

Sunday night. Watching the taped last race of the season. I have noticed a couple words that I very rarely hear outside the F1 broadcasts.

Monegasque – a native of Monaco.

Penultimate – next-to-last.

ESPN is carrying the Sky Sports feed from England, which may influence the novelty of the verbiage. Very much enjoy the reporting team, and greatly appreciate Mothers sponsoring the commercial-free shows.

And yes, I know that tape isn’t involved in the delay of a show via YouTube TV. Similarly, ESPN isn’t broadcast – it’s a cable channel. And it isn’t even cable-only, since we get it streamed. *sigh*

6:17 arrival for a 6:30 open.

By strange coincidence, Bettie is watching “A Tale of Two Cities”, the source of “It was the best of times; it was the worst of times”.

It’s not the worst, despite the title, but it’s not the best.

One of my treasured pieces of ancient electronics is my Palm Pilot, a Tungsten E. This was before smart phones. It was also before non-volatile ram, which was introduced with the E2, which Bettie has (and uses). So I have to keep mine charged, which I have done for years. Until now. Tonight, when I plugged it in, I found out the default year for the calendar is 2003. And I found out that I had lost all the stuff I had on there. Bummer.

What was it? Lists of important Bible verses. Some notes I had taken for myself at a significant time of my life. Shirt sizes. Stuff. And now it’s gone.

A good lesson on the transience of things, and the need to pay attention to the passage of time.

He’s not totally right, but he’s also not totally wrong.

I have been missing a lot of church services lately – my work has kept me away about half the Sundays.  I participate online, but I have to say that there is something joyful in corporate worship – singing, taking communion together, hearing the Word preached.

And that reminds me of the words of King David, in Psalm 122:1: I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go into the house of the Lord.”  He was happy, joyful.

Then on one of those “compare and contrast” moments, we have Jesus cleaning out the Temple.  In the book of John, it is recorded that Jesus made a whip out of cords, and used it on the people.  And in John 2:16-17 “Then he said to the pigeon-dealers, “Take those things out of here. Don’t you dare turn my Father’s house into a market!” His disciples remembered the scripture — ‘Zeal for your house has eaten me up’”.  Jesus wants to be joyful in the temple, but cannot be when it is being used for other purposes.  He needed the temple to be holy.

We come now to the time of communion, where Jesus said “Do this in remembrance of Me”. This is a time of joy and happiness, as well as a time of becoming more holy. 1 Corinthians 11:28 says “But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup.”  That is not Jesus coming in with a whip.  It is an invitation for us to take a look at how we have been keeping our own temple, an invitation to be holy, and an invitation to joy.

Let’s pray.

Father God, You know us, better than we know ourselves. Thank You for loving us, thank You for sending Jesus to die in our place, and thank You for continually calling us to holiness.  Thank you for the ever-present reminder of communion, whether in the church house or wherever we are – because you are with us.  In Jesus’ name, amen.

The mess of a debate has been sticking with me. Again, both Trump and Biden showed less respect for the office they attain to (or hold) than is proper.

But Biden calling Trump a “clown” is bothersome. I think he would have been better to follow the example of Job, from the Old Testament. Job had been afflicted greatly by the time this interaction takes place.

Job had already been through a rough day. His livestock, servants, and all his children had been killed – one day. Later on, Satan has given him boils – skin infections – from the sole of his foot to the top of his head. Ouch!

Then his helpful wife offers him some advice. “Are you still holding on to your principles? Curse God and die!”. Wow – with friends like that, who needs enemies?

But Job doesn’t take his frustration out on her. He gently says “You are talking like a foolish woman”. Not “You are a foolish woman”. He notes the similarity and leaves it there.

Biden would do well to spend more time in the Bible. Just sayin’ . . .

Chris Wallace, who managed to keep two unruly children – well, not under control, but headed in the right direction.

Trump had trouble controlling his impulses – no major surprise. He was more steamroller than tank – kept rolling, but (to me) not a lot of offensive blows.

Biden goofed major when he called Trump a clown. Regardless of the truth of the statement, that’s childish, and it wouldn’t surprise me to see that showing up in an attack ad. Biden generally seemed to be reactive. His talking to the camera and lowering his voice worked (again, to me) about as well as Obama’s beer sit-down. Theoretically wonderful, practically awkward.

Surprised me that both sides used the term “Obamacare”.

I predict more civility next time. I hope handlers on both sides will sit their guy down and rub their noses in video of tonight. If this is how the next leader of the USA acts, when they know they are being televised and analyzed…

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